Xtreme Everest: Oxygen Research Symposium

The Department of Anesthesiology at Duke University is pleased to present the Xtreme Everest Symposium: Human Tolerance of Hypoxia: Going to Extremes to Understand Critical Illness.  This conference will review the Xtreme Everest medical research program that takes lessons learned in extreme low oxygen environments, including that found on the summit of Mount Everest, and brings them back to the bedside of the intensive care unit (ICU).

Target Audience

This conference is suitable for anesthesiologists, physiologists, critical care physicians, stroke medicine physicians, neurologists, basic scientists.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  1. Better understand human tolerance and adaption to hypoxia with goal to improve outcomes in critically ill patients.
  2. Improve knowledge of the effects on the human body of long term exposure to low levels of oxygen, and how some individuals adapt better to hypoxia than others.

Why You Should Attend

We depend on air for survival; more specifically we depend on oxygen. Starve the brain of oxygen and damage soon becomes irreparable. Indeed, all major organs – the heart, the lungs, the liver, the kidneys – will begin to malfunction and eventually fail without properly oxygenated blood. Quite simply without oxygen we die.  Low oxygen levels are a critical factor in intensive care patients. In particular, diseases of the heart and lungs, and severe infections prevent adequate amounts of oxygen reaching the cells. This conference will review the Xtreme Everest medical research program that takes lessons learnt in extreme low oxygen environments, including that found on the summit of Mount Everest, and brings them back to the bedside of the intensive care unit (ICU). After listening to all of the excellent topics and debates presented at this year’s conference, participants will be able to incorporate some of the newfound knowledge into their own practices and utilize some guidelines to improve the management of their patients in the perioperative period. Attendees will better understand the roles played by various health care providers in associated fields. The awareness of these different perioperative practitioners is invaluable and is expected to lead to improved communication between providers.

Program Directors

Michael Grocott MD, FRCP, FRCA, FFICM

Michael Grocott MD, FRCP, FRCA, FFICM
Professor of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine
Head, Integrative Physiology and Critical Illness Group
University of Southampton
Southampton, United Kingdom

Timothy E. Miller, MB ChB, FRCA

Timothy E. Miller, MB, ChB, FRCA
Associate Professor of Anesthesiology
Chief, Division of General, Vascular, and Transplant Anesthesiology
Clinical Director, Abdominal Transplant Anesthesiology
Director, Perioperative Medicine Fellowship
General, Vascular, Transplant Division

Visiting Faculty

Christopher Imray, MB BS, DiMM, Clin Med Sci, PhD, FRCS, FRCP, FRGS

Christopher Imray, MB BS, DiMM, Clin Med Sci, PhD, FRCS, FRCP, FRGS
Honorary Professor
Consultant General, Vascular and Transplant Surgeon, Coventry and Warwickshire County Vascular Unit, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust
Coventry, United Kingdom

Denny Levett, BMBCh, PhD, MRCP, FRCA, FFICM

Denny Levett, BMBCh, PhD, MRCP, FRCA, FFICM
Consultant in Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Southampton
Southampton, United Kingdom

Daniel Martin, BSc, MBChB, FRCA, FFICM, PhD, FRGS

Daniel Martin, BSc, MBChB, FRCA, FFICM, PhD, FRGS
Consultant in Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Free Hospital
Senior Lecturer, UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional Science
Member of Caudwell Xtreme Everest expedition 2007
Director of the UCL Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme Environment Medicine
London, United Kingdom

Kay Mitchell, RN, MSc, BSc Hons

Kay Mitchell, RN, MSc, BSc Hons
Critical Care Research Area Senior Research Manager, Southampton NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, UK
University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
Southampton, United Kingdom

Andrew J. Murray, MBiochem, DPhil

Andrew J. Murray, MBiochem, DPhil
Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience
University of Cambridge
Cambridge, United Kingdom

Monty G. Mythen MBBS, MD, FRCA

Monty G Mythen MBBS, MD, FRCA
Smiths Medical Professor of Anesthesia & Critical Care
Director, Centre for Anesthesia, UCL
Director, R&D, UCLH/UCL/RFH Research Support Centre
University College London
London, United Kingdom

Duke University School of Medicine Faculty

David MacLeod, MB

David B. MacLeod, MB BS
Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
Director, Human Pharmacology and Physiology Lab
Orthopaedics, Plastics, and Regional Division

Joseph P. Mathew, MD, MHSc, MBA, FASE

Joseph P. Mathew, MD, MHSc, MBA, FASE
Jerry Reves, MD, Professor of Anesthesiology and Chairman
Professor of Anesthesiology
Cardiothoracic Division

Richard E. Moon, MD, CM, MSc, FRCP, FACP, FCCP

Richard E. Moon, MD, CM, MSc, FRCP(C), FACP, FCCP
Medical Director, Center for Hyperbaric Medicine & Environmental Physiology
Professor of Anesthesiology
General, Vascular, Transplant Division

Thursday, June 14, 2018
Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Research Building
103 Bryan Research Building
311 Research Drive
Durham, NC 27710

12:30 pmRegistration
 1:00 pmWelcome and Opening Remarks
SESSION 1: Surviving Hypoxia – Is it About Delivery or Consumption?
1:10 pmCritical Care – Can we Learn From Environmental Physiology?Prof. Mike Grocott
1:30 pmWhat Happens to Healthy Humans in Hypoxia?Denny Levett, MD
1:50 pmCardiovascular Adaptation to HypoxiaDaniel Martin, MD
2:10 pmMetabolic Adaptation to HypoxiaAndrew Murray, MD
2:30 pmQuestions and Discussion
3:00 pmBreak
SESSION 2: Oxygen in Clinical Practice – More or Less?
3:30 pmOxygen Therapy: The Yin and Yang of Our Favorite DrugProf. Monty Mythen
3:50 pmOxygen and the BrainChris Imray, MD
4:10 pmEpigenetics of HypoxiaKay Mitchell, MD
4:30 pmA Slightly Different Path to Everest: Pyramid Lab 2012 & 2016David MacLeod, MD
4:50 pmTherapeutic Hyperoxia: Medicine Under PressureRichard Moon, MD
5:10 pmQuestions and Discussion

Thursday Evening, June 14, 2018
Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans Center for Health Education
Trent Semans Great Hall
8 Searle Center Drive
Durham, NC 27710

SESSION 3: Plenary Session
5:30 pmEvening Reception
6:30 pmMorpheus Consortium Distinguished Lecture:
Xtreme Everest: Physiology on Top of the World
Prof. Mike Grocott
7:15 pmQuestions and Closing RemarksJoseph Mathew, MD

Education Credits

Application for CME accreditation has been submitted for approval.

Special Needs

The Duke University School of Medicine’s Department of Anesthesiology is committed to making its activities accessible to all individuals. If any participant in this educational activity is in  need of accommodations, please do not hesitate to notify us by phone or email in order to receive service. Please contact Beth Peloquin at 919-681-9940 or beth.peloquin@duke.edu.

What is included:

  1. Registration fees for the conference
  2. Complimentary evening reception at 5:30 pm

Registration Fees:

RegistrantDukeNon-Duke
Physicians/Faculty$0$95
Trainees (Residents, Fellows, postdocs and med students)*$0$50
RNs/CRNAs$0$50
Other (non-academic, etc)$0$125

*A letter signed by your director or chair stating that you are a resident, fellow or nursing student may be required.

Ways to Register:

Online:

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Registration confirmations will be mailed to the address or e-mail provided. Please mail your confirmation along with your payment to the address below. Accepted methods of payment are personal check, money order, or cash on site. Checks should be made payable to "Duke University."

Mail checks to:
Duke University
Attn: Beth Peloquin
Department of Anesthesiology
905 S. LaSalle Street
Snyderman Building, Office 2032
Durham, NC 27710
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Email, Fax or Mail:

Click here to download the registration form. Please complete the form. You can scan/email (beth.peloquin@duke.edu), fax (919-613-2324) or mail to the address below with your payment. Registration confirmations will be mailed to the address or email provided. Accepted methods of payment are personal check, money order, or cash on site. Checks should be made payable to “Duke University.”

Mail checks to:
Duke University
Attn: Beth Peloquin
Department of Anesthesiology
905 S. LaSalle Street
Snyderman Building, Office 2032
Durham, NC 27710

Cancellation/Refund Policy:

A written notice of cancellation must be received 15 days prior to the start of the activity. A 50% cancellation fee will be assessed at that time. After that date, cancellation requests cannot be honored. If you have any questions about this policy, please contact Beth Peloquin, Program Coordinator, at 919-681-9940 or beth.peloquin@duke.edu.

Photography, Video, and Audio/Visual Recordings Policy:

The Duke University School of Medicine’s Department of Anesthesiology (DOA) reserves the exclusive right to use any photographs/videos/audio recordings taken at any event hosted by DOA without the expressed written permission of those included in the photographs/videos/audio recordings. As a participant, attendee, exhibitor, sponsor, and/or guest at the Xtreme Everest Symposium, you acknowledge that photographs/videos/audio recordings may be taken of you, therefore granting permission to DOA (and its agents) to use the photographs/videos/audio recordings in publications or other media materials produced by DOA, including but not limited to: websites, social media pages, newsletters, brochures, etc. Registrants attending a DOA event who do not want to have their images/voices recorded for distribution, must send a written request to DOA at 315 Trent Drive, DUMC 3094, MS #48, Durham, NC, 27710 at least two weeks before the start date of the event. Unauthorized recording at the event is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to, recordings of presentations or reproductions of supporting audio/visual materials, exhibits, and other supporting continuing education materials.

  1. Every effort has been made in supplying information that is accurate and current. However, the Duke University School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology, Duke Health or Duke University does not accept responsibility for errors or omissions and accepts no liability for any loss or damage howsoever arising.
  2. The opinions expressed at this conference are exclusively those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Duke University School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology, Duke Health or Duke University.
  3. Conference attendees must make their own travel arrangements, including lodging and boarding.
  4. International visitors must make their own travel arrangements as stated above, including travel visa at their closest US Embassy/Consulate (information on locations available on the internet at http://usembassy.state.gov/. Please apply for and obtain the necessary visa well in advance. The refund policy on the registration page remains the same for international travelers. The Duke University School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology or Duke University Medical Center cannot be held responsible for visa denials at the US Embassy/Consulate. International visitors must also register with Duke Visa Services. On arrival, the program coordinator will assist with registration procedures with Duke Visa Services.

For General Conference and Registration Questions

Please contact Beth Peloquin, Program Coordinator, at 919-681-9940 or beth.peloquin@duke.edu.

Xtreme Everest in the News

Xtreme Everest in the News

In a Wired article featuring one of the speakers at this meeting, Professor Michael Grocott, learn how he and the medical research team, Xtreme Everest, are uncovering the secrets of extreme fitness in a lab in one of earth’s most oxygen-starved places.

Chris KeithXtreme Everest Symposium: Human Tolerance of Hypoxia