Friendships Keep Anesthesia Technician at Duke for 40 Years

By Morag Maclachlan, Duke Health

Jessie Swain, CRNAWhen Senior Anesthesia Technician Jessie Swain started at Duke in 1978 he never thought he would stay until retirement.

“You never go anywhere thinking you’ll be there for 40 years,” Swain said. “But when you like what you do, why change?”

Swain retired on July 31 after 42 years at Duke. He spent the majority of those four decades with Duke Anesthesiology. He began his career as a medical supply assembler, turning over rooms after cases and stocking carts. He then became an anesthesia technician, assisting the anesthesiologists with administering medication to patients and troubleshooting equipment. Not only did he enjoy the work, he enjoyed the people.

“The most important part of the job was the friendships I made with the residents, anesthesiologists and surgeons,” Swain said. “We have a responsibility to help patients in their time of need. And we worked together as a family.”

Anesthesiologist Madhav Swaminathan, MD, said Swain always referred to him as “professor,” even early on in Swaminathan’s career. He also always asked how Swaminathan’s family was doing.

“Jessie is the consummate professional and one of the kindest human beings I know. Always working with a smile and a laugh. Eager to help anyone at any time, he simply was the role model and set the bar for professionalism in the OR,” said Swaminathan. “He makes everyone around him feel valued and important. He has probably positively shaped more lives in his 42 years at Duke than he will ever know.”

Swain is hoping to return to his Duke family in a part-time capacity beginning this fall.

“I don’t want to quit anything cold turkey,” he said. “I will come back a couple days a week to keep the camaraderie.”

Stacey HiltonFriendships Keep Anesthesia Technician at Duke for 40 Years
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Duke Anesthesiology Ranked #4 in the Nation Among Specialties

Duke Anesthesiology - 4th in the Nation!

U.S. News & World Report assessed 120 medical schools and once again ranked the Duke University School of Medicine among the best in the nation, placing it 12th. The medical school’s physical therapy program ranked No. 7 among 244 programs evaluated. Seven of the School of Medicine’s clinical departments ranked in the top 10 among specialties: 

  • Surgery (fourth)
  • Anesthesiology (fourth)
  • Internal Medicine (fifth)
  • Radiology (tied, fifth)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology (tied, fifth)
  • Psychiatry (tied, tenth)
  • Pediatrics (tied, ninth)

Earlier this year, the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research ranked Duke eighth among the nation’s top medical schools for funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Eight Duke School of Medicine departments and one basic science discipline also ranked among the top ten in the country for NIH funding:

  • Pediatrics (first)
  • Surgery (third)
  • Internal Medicine (fourth)
  • Neurosurgery (fourth)
  • Orthopedics (fifth)
  • Ophthalmology (seventh)
  • Anesthesiology (eighth)
  • Psychiatry (ninth)
  • Genetics (tenth)

In addition to its national rankings, Duke is also ranked among the top 10 United States medical schools in the World University Rankings.

“Our stature as one of the preeminent medical schools in the nation and world is a direct reflection of our exceptional faculty, students and staff who consistently raise the bar for medical research, education and patient care,” said Mary E. Klotman, M.D., dean of Duke University School of Medicine. “I am especially proud of our departments and medical education programs which consistently rank in the top among their peers each year.”

“Our school of medicine is ranked amongst the best in the world, thanks to the extraordinary talent, and commitment of our faculty, staff and trainees,” said A. Eugene Washington, M.D., chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and president and chief executive officer of the Duke University Health System. “Year after year, the Duke University School of Medicine has consistently pushed our patient care, research and education missions to higher levels of excellence and impact and for that, we are very proud.”

Source: Duke University School of Medicine’s Med School Blog (Durham, NC – March 17, 2020)

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2019 Duke Anesthesiology Career Service Awards

2019 Duke Anesthesiology Career Service Awards

Duke Anesthesiology proudly recognizes members of the department who have demonstrated outstanding service and dedication to Duke! We thank them for their commitment to this team and the patients we serve!

Moon, Richard
Stolp, Bryant W.
Thomas, Donald K.

Massey, Sanders
Parrillo, Stephen

Kwatra, Madan M.

Fras, Anne M.
Harris, Charles A.
Kempton, Brady L.
McKenzie, Edward
Moretti, Eugene W.
Pellom, Gary Lee
Wahl, Kerri M.
Warner, David S.

Beck, Christy
James, Michael L.
Lee, David D.
Olufolabi, Adeyemi J.
Taekman, Jeffrey M.
Williams, Regina R.

Ames, Warwick A.
Amyot, Michael J.
Dooley, Joshua R.
Elgasim, Magdi A.
Francisco Macalino, Maria M.
Harris, Erica M.
Mills, Jeffrey L.
Underwood, Ashley M.

Berger, Miles
Butler, Philip E.
Cooke, Jaime
Fiore, Amelia
Foureman, Megan F.
Goodeve, Sandra R.

Hunt, Josephine
Karhausen, Jorn
King, Derrick T.
King, Nicole L.
Knipper, Thomas P.

Maji, Debabrata
Ohlendorf, Brian J.
Porter, Kristine M.
Quinones, Quintin J.
Saunders, Frieda

Achanta, Satyanarayana
Boyle, Jason
Cooter, Mary
De Caceres Bustos, Ana I.
Gadsden, Jeffrey
Ghadimi, Kamrouz
Gratian, Christopher C.
Greene, Nathaniel H.
Hashmi, Nazish

Hicks, Rosa
Hoffmann, Ulrike
Hooge, Nicolette
Iboaya, Ehimemen
Jones-haywood, Mandisa-Maia
Maisonave, Yasmin
Malinzak, Elizabeth
McClarty, Lashaunda
Scarboro, Stuart
Solanki, Janellisa

Stoia, Deborah
Suarez, Arturo
Sweeney, Katherine E.
Thomas, Neel
Thompson, Annemarie
Traylor, Austin
Udani, Andrea
Udani, Ankeet
Waters, Lindsay

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Duke Anesthesiology Ranked #5 in the Nation

US News & World Report Best Grad Schools: Duke Anesthesiology Ranked 5th in the NationU.S. News & World Report assessed 120 medical schools and once again ranked the Duke University School of Medicine among the best in the nation, placing it 13th in a tie with the University of Pittsburgh and Yale University. The medical school’s Physician Assistant program was again ranked No. 1, tied with the University of Iowa, among 169 programs evaluated — a top spot it has held for several years.

Eight of the School of Medicine’s clinical departments ranked in the top 10 among specialties:

Surgery (second)
Internal Medicine (fourth)
Anesthesiology (fifth)
Radiology (sixth)
Psychiatry (tied, sixth)
Obstetrics and Gynecology (tied, eighth)
Pediatrics (tied, 10th)
Family Medicine (10th)

“I’m proud of all of these distinctions, but I am most proud of the shared commitment of our faculty, staff and students to be innovative and work tirelessly to improve the health and well-being of people in our own community and throughout the world,” said Mary E. Klotman, M.D., dean of Duke University School of Medicine.

“These rankings once again highlight our national leadership in educating tomorrow’s health sciences leaders,” said A. Eugene Washington, M.D., chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and president and chief executive officer of the Duke University Health System. “Our faculty, staff and trainees demonstrate the highest level of excellence in clinical care, research and education, and it’s gratifying to be recognized for their efforts.”

“We are honored to be consistently ranked as one of the top Physician Assistant Programs in the U.S.,” said Jacqueline S. Barnett, director of the Duke Physician Assistant Program, which is part of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health in the School of Medicine. “This achievement speaks to having excellent institutional support, exceptional and dedicated faculty, staff, preceptors and alumni, and outstanding students who serve as great ambassadors for the Duke PA program and the PA profession.”

U.S. News annually ranks graduate schools in six disciplines, including business, law, medicine, nursing, engineering and education. The magazine uses criteria such as grade-point averages of incoming students, acceptance rates and employment outcomes of graduates. For medical schools, the magazine also weighs NIH funding, NIH funding per faculty member, medical school entrance scores and grade point averages, among other criteria.

Source: Duke University School of Medicine’s Med School Blog (Durham, NC – March 12, 2019)

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